Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: Statistics

The Statistical Edge: Enhance Your Metrics with the Actuarial Valuation Method

Submitted by Michelle Young at Toptal

Authored by Dani Freidus, Finance Expert for Toptal

Edited by Lynn Patra

Executive Summary

What Is an Actuary?
The Power of the Actuarial Valuation Method
How Can an Actuary Help to Enhance Business Metrics?
How You Can Start to Implement This Now

Beyond Insurance: The Changing Role and Perception of Actuaries

I often hear the question “What is an actuary?” Well, actuaries are unique in that they have a deep understanding of both business and statistics. Traditionally, an actuary’s differentiator was their ability to make financial sense of extremely long-term horizons—typically those associated with the lifespan of human beings. This naturally lent itself to actuaries working in the age-old fields of life insurance and pensions

However, it is not just an actuary’s grasp of the long term which is unique but also their ability to harness a broad range of academic fields and apply them in a business context. To this end, the Actuaries Institute defines actuaries as professionals who: Read more of this post

Advertisements

10 Shocking Stats About Employee Engagement [Infographic]

Are these percentages shocking? Perhaps not to those of us who’re very intimately acquainted with the typical work scene. Likewise, perhaps not to those of us who’ve been following the issue of work engagement for a long while and are familiar with what studies have been saying. However, it’s important for leaders and managers to familiarize themselves with the concept of engagement, its implications, and what may be the reality at their organization. Take a look at this infographic, see if this describes the scenario at your organization, and share! Read more of this post

This INTJ’s Take on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

Typealyzer

My Typealyzer result: NT for “Rationals” and INTJ specifically.

Having written on the subject of surveillance, I’ve been exploring how much insight others can possibly acquire about you just based on your writing. From here, it didn’t take long to discover various text analyzers developed through uClassify.com (most of which seem crudely put together), but I’m pretty sure more sophisticated, and less readily accessible, text analyzers exist elsewhere. Of those that are available to the public, Typealyzer (which gives you a Myers Briggs type based on your writing) has been most frequently discussed by bloggers. Did the Typealyzer accurately classify me? Although there are infrequent variations on individual posts, for the most part, it has classified me as INTJ and this is consistent with how I score on self-reported assessments across time and situations as well as others’ evaluation of me.

Yes, much uproar has been made about MBTI’s reliability (or rather lack thereof) in recent years. In this post, I will delve deeper into problems encountered in the use of the MBTI. After some thought, I believe I can reconcile claims of unreliability with claims of reliability (and meaningfulness for some test-takers). To begin with, a better question than “Does MBTI have good/poor reliability?” is “For whom does MBTI have good/poor reliability?” See the discussion (pages 290-292) in Capraro, R. M. & Capraro, M. M. (2010) about why it may be incorrect, in this case, to speak of reliability for a tool or instrument. Rather, it may be more accurate to talk about reliability for a particular evaluation or the interaction of evaluation and assessment tool. This article is available here and here. Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: