Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: nature

To Live Differently – A Personal Manifesto

Recently, I realized that I’m coming upon 3 years of blogging about modern work-life issues and, particularly, remote work. With regard to the latter, I’ve repeatedly mentioned benefits for the environment, some employers, and some employees. However, I’ve yet to share my personal views and reasons for my insane dedication to this topic.

Some presume that I’m a lofty idealist, envisioning that everyone will be working this way in the future. On the contrary, I’m quite a realist and know that not everyone wants to. For example, some enjoy commuting for the hour or two designated to listening to their favorite podcasts. (Though, as I like to point out, one can still walk around the neighborhood for that amount of time and listen to a podcast before and after working at home or wherever one chooses to work.) Nevertheless, I’ve blogged incessantly to spread awareness of remote work as a real choice while realizing that individual preferences would, to some extent, assert themselves and determine who works remotely and the proportion of time spent doing so. Read more of this post

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Team Nature or Team Nurture? Disillusionment with the Great Debate

Many of you have no doubt experienced times where you’ve reevaluated educational or career decisions and reconsidered what you hoped to have gained through your devotion to a particular field in hindsight. For me, this time came – a principle reason why I’ve slowed down on the blogging and why this post will be a bit different. Having spent time thinking about my own decisions and what I’d hoped to gain by acquiring a professional degree and training in psychology, I’ll address the problems with the “specialist” model of work, team vs. team mentality, and professional culture-fit in this field. Hence, what I have to share may especially be of value to those who’re considering the field of psychology. I hope that aspiring professionals can help change the troubling trends I’ll describe. Read more of this post

Lessons from Gaming: Leading with Your Natural Strengths

In this post, I’ll discuss the reason for these resultant correlations between wealth and range of skills invested in (from What the Most Successful People Have in Common by Nicole Carter):

…middle class survey respondents reported having six skills. The high-net-worth group, on the other hand, reported having only two skills. That’s because the most successful people are aware of their limitations and strengths, and focus on what they’re best at, Schiff said. In fact, 58 percent of middle class millionaires said they work to improve on skills they lack, but only 7 percent of high-net -worth individuals do the same. The wealthiest respondents? Not one of them said they worked on improving areas of weakness. Read more of this post

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