Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: LinkedIn

My answer to a Quora question: Is it acceptable to be apolitical on LinkedIn?

In this answer, I addressed the question’s original poster (hereafter referred to as “OP”) who stated, “I have been on LinkedIn for years. I no longer feel that I belong there anymore because I came there to network for jobs rather than to discuss politics or religion… I have been struggling to find work, but LinkedIn no longer appears to be an option.” I described the general state of LinkedIn, from my own personal experience, at Is it acceptable to be apolitical on LinkedIn? by Lynn Patra. An excerpt of my answer follows: Read more of this post

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Social Media Platforms That Consolidate Your Other Social Media Activities

Over the past few months I’ve learned more about various social media tools by sitting in on classes offered in my region through 530 Media Project. Michelle Rogers, content editor at The Record Searchlight/Redding.com, facilitated these classes. By participating, I learned about some platforms that consolidate your activities on other social media sites to give you an overall view (including statistical analysis) of your activities. In this post, I’ll introduce a couple of them: RebelMouse and Klout.

RebelMouse

RebelMouse merges the content you share or like on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, RSS feeds, Pinterest, Flickr, Google+, and LinkedIn. What you receive is an attractive magazine-like, social front page display of your online presence. See what mine looks like below (click to enlarge). Read more of this post

Not Interested in Dating on LinkedIn?

Neither am I. Although it’s generally advised to only connect with those you already know on LinkedIn, some of us benefit from keeping more of an open door policy and giving others a chance to express why they are interested in connecting with you. During the course of networking, encountering those with a PUA (pick-up artist) mentality becomes almost inevitable and, consequently, one doesn’t have to search very hard to find people speaking out about others acting unprofessionally on LinkedIn (see hereherehere, and here). Read more of this post

Portraying Yourself Professionally Through Social Media [Infographic]

For those who’re purposefully looking to maintain a professional image via social media, here’s an infographic that has been going around. Much of this information is based on common sense. However, the percentages reflecting employers’ or recruiter’s emphasis on some social media sites more than others for information about you may be particularly helpful to keep in mind. Hence, you can make an informed decision about where to expend your efforts. Alternatively, for those of you interested in protecting your privacy, some general but important tips appear towards the bottom of this graphic.

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The Underbelly of Online Social Networking: Stalking & Other Obsessive Behavior

For many professionals, the Internet is a valuable supplemental tool for promoting themselves as well as for meeting new and valuable contacts. Like other life phenomena however, building social connections over the Internet is not without risks, and this becomes very apparent when one experiences a rare encounter with a very attached individual. Read more of this post

How to Write a LinkedIn Headline That Attracts Recruiters

Want to know what you can do to attract recruiters through LinkedIn? Here are some excellent tips on developing your LinkedIn headline from Donna Schilder at Purdue CCO Blog. There’s much to learn there, so check it out!

The Gig Economy: Hope for Renaissance Men and Women?

English: Self-portrait of Leonardo da Vinci. R...

Stories of young adults facing the realities of advancing in today’s work world (like this one here) bring to mind one of the worst aspects of working in the silos of the Industrial Age. Those of us who want to make a living off of our desire to excel in multiple fields are constantly reminded that having anything more than a monotonous list of the same roles on our résumé or LinkedIn profile page is the “kiss of death.” Yet, those of us who count ourselves as polymaths have experienced how expertise in one field, through providing a fresh perspective and broadened understanding, enables us to make valuable contributions to work in another. Wouldn’t it be great to live in a world where we can point to our multifaceted experiences, flexible minds, and insatiable curiosity as advantages and be taken seriously? Read more of this post

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