Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: innovation

The Rise of the Robot Nurse [Infographic]

As a natural follow-up to the previous post on designing technology for the aging population, the following infographic, which was submitted by Circa Interactive, describes the rise of robot nurses. This infographic was originally created by Ohio University’s Masters of Science program in nursing.

Via onlinemasters.ohio.edu/masters-nursing:

As technology continues to advance and become cheaper and more accessible, its uses are increasingly benefiting human workers in the healthcare industry.Globally, medical professionals are experimenting with ways in which robots can fill growing caps in the healthcare workforce. These experiments are becoming increasingly important: U.S. Census Bureau estimates indicate nearly 25 percent of the population will be 65 or older by 2060, meaning demands for more care will be imminent.

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#HRPA2015: Why Your Organization Needs More Rebels, Heretics, and Weirdos

Here’s a post I’ve been meaning to share as it resonates with me deeply. Those of us who consider ourselves freethinkers and enjoy the process and benefits of honest, spirited debate and conflict have probably, at one time or another, experienced a form of oppression in situations where cultural norms overemphasize social harmony, cooperation, and cohesion. The problem with striving for an atmosphere of perpetual warmth and agreement, as Jane Watson describes, is that great ideas get squashed. Hence, going against conventional wisdom with regard to hiring for cultural fit is especially important for organizations that aim to be innovative. Watson’s post provides a thought-provoking alternative view on what makes a great team, so check it out!

Talent Vanguard

What a whirlwind at the 2015 HRPA Annual Conference this week! On day one, following three keynotes, 2 sessions, lots of coffee, and two after-parties later, I arrived home with a brain full of ideas and an iPhone full of notes. Here’s my first post from this week’s HRPA Annual Conference 2015:

Why Your Organization Needs More Rebels, Heretics, and Weirdos

Take a second and think about the best team that you have ever been part of. What made the team great? What did it feel like to be part of it? How did the team members interact with one another?

If the team you’re thinking of was the picture of harmony and cooperation, it might be worth questioning your rose-coloured recollections of just how great it actually was. In the session “When Getting Along Doesn’t Equal Results” Nicole Bendaly notes that while harmony and cohesiveness often figure into our…

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Is our native intelligence being burdened by increasing complexity?

Are People Getting Dumber?: The World Grows More Complex” presents one of the funniest social commentaries I’ve ever read. At another level, I know it’s not a funny issue of course. Rather, this turns out to be an interesting one to think about. Here is an excerpt as written by Linda S. Gottfredson, a professor in the School of Education who studies the sociology of intelligence at the University of Delaware:

Many of us feel stupider by the year, if not the week. Age and ill health take their toll, but Mother Nature isn’t the culprit. It’s those clever people busily complicating our lives, innovation by innovation, upgrade upon upgrade. They don’t lower our native intelligence, but relentlessly burden it… Just ask a humorist. One “Frank and Ernest” comic strip shows a caveman pointing to an engraved stone tablet and saying: “Look! I just invented writing!” His companion says: “Thanks a lot! You just made everybody else in the world illiterate!” Read more of this post

5 Factors That Determine How Innovations Gain Adoption

innovation - 3

innovation – 3 (Photo credit: nyoin)

One question telework advocates often entertain but can’t definitively answer is, “When will working anywhere and anytime gain more widespread acceptance?” Having researched this topic extensively, I’ve seen plenty of predictions that didn’t come to pass. Moreover, many are scratching their heads asking questions along the lines of, “Why hasn’t this happened already? We had the technological capability back in…” Yes, to a great extent, we are still working like it’s 1980. Furthermore, others muse that it will take a disaster of epic proportions (e.g., major natural disaster, pandemic, etc.) for the powers that be to change the way we work.

We know that new ideas and situations are scary to many, however I wanted to go beyond the scariness factor. Delving into factors that come into play with regard to coming up with a good, educated guess only opened up more issues to think about. Upon researching why it’s so difficult to predict if and when innovations gain acceptance, I came upon this wonderful explanation of factors which provided much fodder for thinking about the issue of resistance to telework. Excerpt: Read more of this post

The Work Revolution: Freedom and Excellence for All

Julie Clow’s The Work Revolution: Freedom and Excellence for All is an engaging and practical guide written for organizational leaders and thinkers interested in the issue of optimizing organizational structure and culture to suit business needs in the Information Age. Towards the beginning of the book, she provides a comprehensive self-assessment quiz that covers various facets of the organization’s philosophy, the rules, leadership, team and coworkers, and the leader’s role. A chart is provided to record scores and the rating criteria is clear-cut, showing specific areas of strengths and weaknesses. The remainder of the book expands upon the subject matter covered in the quiz providing suggestions for improvement in the process. Read more of this post

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