Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: Google

Social Media Platforms That Consolidate Your Other Social Media Activities

Over the past few months I’ve learned more about various social media tools by sitting in on classes offered in my region through 530 Media Project. Michelle Rogers, content editor at The Record Searchlight/Redding.com, facilitated these classes. By participating, I learned about some platforms that consolidate your activities on other social media sites to give you an overall view (including statistical analysis) of your activities. In this post, I’ll introduce a couple of them: RebelMouse and Klout.

RebelMouse

RebelMouse merges the content you share or like on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, RSS feeds, Pinterest, Flickr, Google+, and LinkedIn. What you receive is an attractive magazine-like, social front page display of your online presence. See what mine looks like below (click to enlarge). Read more of this post

If Dining Environment Can Make Food Taste Bad, Can Work Environment Sour Experience of Work?

Hostile Work Environment

Hostile Work Environment (Photo credit: e_monk)

What better way to illustrate how experience of a stimulus (held constant) is shaped by environmental factors than to examine how our experience of food changes according to the ambiance of the dining area? Check out the findings in Eating in a cafeteria makes food taste worse. Even when factoring out the possibility of particular odors in the environment impacting the taste of food, visual information remains an important factor as many of us know intuitively. Our interpretation of this visual information transforms our experience. Some examples from common knowledge: Read more of this post

Work isn’t working: Microsoft ‘envisioner’ Dave Coplin on why the office must change

Ross McGuinness provides an apt description of how little we have deviated from the centralized workplace and the uniform work shift since Victorian times. Our ongoing resistance to utilizing technology to its fullest potential translates into missed opportunities for boosting productivity and creativity as compelling employees to experience the “daily grind” fosters disengagement. Furthermore, the open office plan appears to pose more problems with regard to productivity and creativity. Little wonder that people who work in an open office environment take more sick days compared to people who have their own private workspaces for instance! Read on for more specific information about today’s deficient work arrangements.

Images of Industrial Age Office Work: Clock Watcher

Clock Watcher 16" X 20" acrylic Copyright © 2013 by Nathan Myhre

Clock Watcher 16″ X 20″ acrylic
Copyright © 2013 by Nathan Myhre

A couple of months ago, I mentioned that Nathan Myhre would be contributing art that represents the life of the average Industrial Age knowledge worker. I say “Industrial Age” even when it comes to post-Industrial parts of the world because we’re still bidding a long and difficult farewell to the Industrial Age work-style with most knowledge workers coming, going, and working essentially the same work-shift (9-to-5). What’s the alternative? Harness and utilize today’s technology to give workers more control over where and when they work as well as to work more productively. Read more of this post

Independent Thinkers Need Not Apply

Creativity

Creativity (Photo credit: Mediocre2010)

An issue recently came up with regard to describing oneself as an “independent thinker” on one’s resumé. One of my contacts in Human Resources advised me that this is generally construed as someone who doesn’t follow directions or is resistant to feedback from a supervisor. (I’m guessing that synonyms such as “autonomous” aren’t any better.) However, wherever I look, I see organizations that are interested in innovation as a matter of survival in today’s hyper-competitive world. Hence, I also keep seeing demand for workers who can contribute a fresh outlook and think creatively. Read more of this post

They need to see you there to know that you are working… Not!

Any knowledge workers here ever pretend to work? Perhaps you’ve squinted your eyes to feign concentration as you gaze at that document you’re working on and, all the while, thought about what you’re going to have for dinner. People around you just tended to assume you’re working right? If pretending to work is new to you, head on over to Google and search “how to pretend to work” or “how to look busy at work” and you will find that some people have it down to a science. How did we ever get here? You can gain an understanding about the problem of measuring knowledge work productivity by reading GSA Enterprise Transformation’s Knowledge Worker Productivity: Challenges, Issues, Solutions (click to download).  As of the year 2011, the author explains (pp. 2-3): Read more of this post

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