Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: Generation Y

Thoughts on Running the Flipside Workspace versus Videoconferencing Study

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted, so I’ll first address the slowdown on my blog. Thankfully, this isn’t about running out of steam but, rather, preoccupation with projects – including the Flipside Workspace user experience study which I mentioned in January 2015. As it is wrapping up, this is a good time to revisit it and provide detailed information. What I left unmentioned previously is that this study contrasts users’ experience meeting in Flipside Workspace with videoconferencing across various psychological dimensions.

For those who’re new to Flipside Workspace, this is an avatar-based,  3-dimensional digital workspace. It’s best described at Flipside Workspace’s site as, “an immersive online business district that takes those perks of real-life office dynamics and brings them into a virtual environment.” To see how elaborately crafted the environment is, watch this video. Read more of this post

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On Becoming a Better Writer

Does using text-speak erode our writing skills? There has been much debate regarding this issue. While investigating various opinions, I was surprised by the following statements at Northhampton Community College’s site:

According to a recent survey, employers would rather hire workers over 50 than those under 30. This survey indicates that respondents stated older workers are more professional and have better writing skills than their younger counterparts. 46% of respondents stated younger workers needed to improve their writing skills versus just 9% for workers over 50.

 

The slow demise of the English language is nothing new. People have been lamenting the use of poor grammar and writing skills for years. However, it seems that the use of Instant Messaging (IM) and Texting has accelerated this decline to a record pace. Is new technology to blame? There is evidence that supports that conclusion.

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Video to Introduce a Concept: Yay or Nay?

Online collaboration tools empower us by providing the opportunity to maintain a presence in multiple locations at once. This concept is illustrated by the latest video created by the Flipside Workspace team. To truly appreciate the rich scenery and immersive experience however, don’t just watch the video… give Flipside a try! Having done so myself, I can tell you that this platform holds special appeal to untold numbers of Generation X and Y members who’re already adept at navigating interactive virtual environments. In other words, we can take to this like a fish takes to water.

Lisa Duncan | Alternative Workstyle Enthusiast

Sometimes when working in an alternative workstyle, you really do need to be in two places at once.  As a consultant, it’s the only way to be productive AND responsive to your geographically dispersed clients.

Readers of this blog know we created Flipside Workspace as the online collaboration platform for the consulting arm of Duncan+Coleverria, Inc.   It’s worked so well for us, we’re slowly opening it up to other companies and small businesses.  We decided to approach the introduction of Flipside Workspace using video, since most people have difficulty grasping the concept of using virtual worlds in a business setting.

It’s too early to tell if we’ve been successful, but we did have a lot of fun creating this.  We put our blood, sweat, and tears into making it just right.  Soon, Anna Marie (AKA The Awkard Gawker) will be writing about how we put this together in…

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The Multi-Generational Workforce: Differences & Conflicts

A Baby Boomer says to a Gen X’er, “You should hope that they turn your job into a permanent career position so that you can stay here for the next twenty-five years!”

Gen X’er thinks, Twenty-five years?! Are you trying to scare me off?

It’s amazing how often I’ve encountered such difference in values. Some have argued that these generational differences are merely a function of age and maturity. That is, members of an older generation were more similar members of the younger generation way back when they were that age and, on the other hand, members of the younger generation would bear more resemblance to the older generation when they’ve aged in turn. However, I’m more inclined to side with those who assert that there are real differences between Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y due to differences in degree to which they were exposed to technology as well as the impact of major events during their formative years. Read more of this post

Keeping Up with Technology: Your Interest Level is the Limit

Recently, I was given this friendly warning: When you’re old and gray, you’ll see what it’s like to be behind the times and to be uncomfortable with the new tools and gadgets. As many of us can attest, this association between age and obsolescence is pervasive and rarely questioned.

Life experience, however, has shown me that the actual cause of not being able to keep up isn’t age but lack of interest. If we take the established age groups – Baby Boomers, Generations X, Y, and Z (the Millennials) and parse everyone in each group out according to interest level in new technologies, wouldn’t this provide a more accurate, fine-grained reflection of who’s ahead and behind on the latest technologies? Perhaps you’ll see where that aforementioned association comes from. However, aging isn’t the root cause of falling behind. Read more of this post

Social Bonding Over Distance & a Look at the Lives of Digital Natives

Do we really need to commute back and forth every workday in order to foster and maintain relationships with a given group of people? Let’s consider this question. During my exploration of how dispersed teams function, I’ve encountered people (such as described in this post) who meet in person as infrequently as once a quarter. It surprises most people that this can work. Speaking from my own experience as a team member of Better Collaboration, I’m happy to report that there are other factors (aside from opportunities for in-person interaction) contributing to a sense of cohesion.

Upon comparing my experiences with in-person versus technologically-mediated meetings, I’ve observed that having a strong shared sense of purpose and common interests helps transcend the physical distance factor. So when I hear people say they would rather have others drive from one city to another just for the sake of getting everyone in one room for every meeting rather than have occasional virtual meetings, I wince. Read more of this post

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