Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: economy

My Life with Animals: Loki’s recovery part two – the great poop watch of 2012

If this content seems odd and off-topic, bear with me as I tie this to my blog’s subject matter. Autumn always draws my attention to the fact that the year will soon end. When this year ends it’ll be 9 years since the Great Recession began. Can you think of many places that have scarcely recovered after all these years? Let me know. As for me, the still bleak economic condition of my hometown of Redding, California always sticks out.

Despite a prevalent impression that there’s nothing to see or do here however, Redding has notable points of interests. Turtle Bay is one of them. During tough times, Turtle Bay continued to adapt and improve operations, including the current transition to a more sustainable business model. If any of you plan to visit Northern California or just pass through, consider giving Turtle Bay, and Redding, your patronage. This story showcases the staff’s devotion to their non-human residents but they also stress that wild animals belong in the wild.

Turtle Bay Blog

I sat for eight hours on the floor with Loki, trying to make him comfortable enough for him to sleep and diligently watching his IV lines. By the end of the day, the vet said that Loki had had a sufficient amount of the IV antibiotics and pain meds that he could leave the clinic. But before we could go, the vet put a pain patch on Loki’s front leg that needed to stay on for three days and that meant that the cone-of-shame needed to stay on as well. Evidently, we weren’t out of the woods yet in many ways.  First, it was going to take a small miracle to stop Loki from getting to that pain patch and consuming it. Second, we still didn’t know if his intestines would heal well enough to hold.  We had to wait for him to successfully defecate to know he was okay. And so…

View original post 933 more words

Is it conceivable? Thinking of a way to reconstruct a society in which all the work is being performed by technology makes for an interesting thought exercise indeed. However, some thinkers (such as Andrew McAfee in his TED presentation – see my previous post “The Move Towards Self-Employment“) do see the possibility of a life where people are freed up to do other things. Can the currently assumed exchange between work and consumption be broken? Can the current unemployment situation be but a painful transition on to a life that is ultimately better? If money no longer mattered, perhaps some people would still be working and striving, but for different rewards (such as popularity or mere thrill of competition) as one of my conversation partners hypothesized. This possibility has optimists exclaiming “100% unemployment now!” However if we are striving towards this type of society, one of the worst risks we take is that our creations turn on us and we live out an event akin to “The Terminator: Rise of the Machines.” On the other hand, the way we currently work is already ruining people’s health and therefore slowly killing a good number of us so, if things keep going the way they are, the issue of our welfare becomes moot. Check out this interesting blog post, “Is 100% unemployment realistic, desirable, and statelessly doable?”

In defense of anagorism

I find it hard to imagine a situation in which all real needs can be satisfied without any work being performed by people. I find it equally hard to believe that we will ever see full employment; understood to mean enough jobs to go around. Automation is real, and it’s inconceivable to me that the future needs all of us. Thus, as long as we are living under a market economy, some of us will be expendable.

Kurt Vonnegut envisioned this scenario in Player Piano, in which people not in-demand enough to merit a paying gig were relagated to the humiliation and indignity of the “Reeks and Wrecks,” a make-work program created to provide the illusion of being a contributing member of society, but the illusion wore thin rather quickly. In Player Piano, the “engineers and managers” are the last dominos left standing. As the nightmare is materializing…

View original post 450 more words

%d bloggers like this: