Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: depression

What Are the Sunday Scaries? (+ How to Combat Them!) – Infographic

Lazy Sundays are a thing of the past. With the rise of hustle culture, the gig economy and workplace apps like Slack and email downloaded to our phones, the pressure to work beyond the typical 9-5 can seem insurmountable –– and that bleeds into the weekend.

The unfortunate reality is that many professionals spend Sunday playing catch-up on household chores and worrying about the workweek ahead. This anxiety, nicknamed the “Sunday Scaries,” has been reported in 80% of professionals

Sunday Scaries mostly manifest as anxiety, but those affected have also reported insomnia and depression, with these feelings increasing throughout the day and peaking in the evening. 

But, luckily, the Sunday Scaries aren’t indestructible. By being mindful of our life choices and adopting some helpful habits (journaling, exercising and socializing included), we can help ease this Sunday anxiety and go into the workweek relaxed and motivated. 

This infographic from Bestow provides a jumping off point for how to identify and combat the Sunday Scaries. 

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Truly need 10, 11, or even 12 hours of sleep per night? By all means, try to get it!

During the course of blogging, I’ve been surprised by how often my previous post about sleep, “Why I Stay Up Late and 3 Reasons You Should Too [Satire],” which celebrates the experiences of people with late chronotypes (also known as “night owls”), has been visited. To spread awareness about another aspect of sleep-wake biorhythms, this post presents information about why it’s important for those of us who truly need 10 or more hours of sleep a night (dubbed “long sleepers”) to get the sleep we need.

Before going further, I’d like to point out that it’s important to resolve any underlying issues (sleep apnea, depression, or other medical conditions) that may be causing someone to sleep for more hours than is normal. If medical conditions have been ruled out, if the long hours of sleep have been consistent and of high quality sleep throughout life, and if the sleeper wakes feeling refreshed, this individual might be a “long sleeper” – a category that describes about 2% of the population (see here). More facts about long sleeping from the American Sleep Association follow: Read more of this post

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