Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Tag Archives: Business

Why Use Route Optimization Software?

With route optimization software you’ll spend much less time planning – and the routes produced will be far superior to manually created routes.

For a mobile workforce, route optimization is the process of determining the most efficient routes, in terms of cost, resources and time. All other relevant factors such as order and driver restrictions, as well as the various workflows of a particular business are also factored in.

The aim is to maximize efficiency and fulfil more orders: getting to more addresses with fewer resources. This allows businesses to save time, costs and ultimately increase their revenue.

With route optimization software, your business will:

  • increase earnings by 10-30% simply by allowing you to complete more orders,
  • improve employee productivity and customer satisfaction,
  • cut operating costs and overtime by 30%.

Using a map, or any other manual means, to create optimized routes is incredibly difficult and time-consuming. As the number of drivers and orders increases, the complexity of the task of dividing up the work accurately and efficiently grows exponentially. Read more of this post

The Gig Economy for Businesses [Infographic]

It’s no secret that the modern workforce is changing. In an era where more value is being placed on workplace autonomy, flexibility and freedom, the gig economy is becoming the new normal. In fact, 36% of workers in the U.S. work in the gig economy (in some form or another). Spurred by technology, the gig economy has helped create a buyer’s market for many job seekers, offering businesses who utilize it’s services the agility businesses need to stay competitive.

It’s likely that you’ve heard of the gig economy as “side hustles” offered through on demand platforms like Uber, Amazon Flex and Postmates. However, the gig economy encompasses a broad range of workers, that are simply “independent.” This means that gig work is everything from rideshare and delivery services to freelance writers, designers, and other contractors.

In the gig economy, there are two sides: that of independent workers and that of businesses who utilize the services of independent workers. To help you better understand the history of the gig economy, how each side works best practices for businesses and independent workers. Startup insurance company, Embroker, put together this comprehensive guide that covers all facets.

For example, in their gig economy for businesses chapter, they cover best practices for startups and companies to best utilize the skills of independent workers. Some of these include:

  • Identifying your needs and skills gaps.
  • Developing a long-term strategy that lets you take advantage of on demand talent
  • Utilizing different platforms like Upwork, Freelancer and others to find experts that work best with your business
  • Different ways to efficiently operate with a blended workforce.

To learn more about these best practices and ways to implement them in your businesses, check out their full guide to the gig economy. Read more of this post

How These 3 E-Commerce Companies Work Remotely

This article was originally published by Index Code

 

Software, mobile development, SaaS, and other tech companies that hire remotely are a dime-a-dozen: companies like Stripe, Buffer, and Coffee Meets Bagel are just a handful of those that benefit from working with top developers all over the world. 

 

Remote workers are penetrating virtually every industry, not just technology. A survey by Upwork found that 63% of companies now have remote workers, and 90% of those working remotely plan to continue doing so for the rest of their careers. Even e-commerce companies are shifting to a remote-friendly culture. While it may seem disjointed to design and produce a physical product with a distributed team, these e-commerce retailers, wholesalers, and brands are harnessing the benefits of remote work. Here’s how they do it. Read more of this post

Oversharing: Your Biggest Cybersecurity Risk Could be You [Infographic]

Having spent the past several months exploring cybersecurity issues, including business-related risks, I encountered the following infographic that may serve as a useful reminder to any individual conducting business online. This includes the self-employed who represent themselves or those representing their business. So check this infographic out for tips on good habits to cultivate for your own cybersecurity!

Via Digital Guardian

Read more of this post

Email Marketing for Financial Advisors: Best Practices for 2019

This article was originally published at ModelFA.com

Email Marketing for Financial Advisors: Best Practices for 2019

email marketing for financial advisors, Email Marketing for Financial Advisors: Best Practices for 2019

Summary:  Email may not have the cutting edge, high-tech appeal of some of the other marketing tactics. However, when done right, email marketing for financial advisors can be remarkably effective. In order to build a productive email campaign, advisors should begin by examining the needs of their audience. A broad-based “spray and pray” approach is the quickest way to burn through your hard-earned email list. On the other hand, highly targeted value-add communications will help you build trust, drive referrals, and stay connected to your prospects and clients. Read on for best practices (by email type) and some common email marketing mistakes to avoid.

Recently, I was fortunate enough to participate in a lively discussion with a thought leadership group comprised of forwarding thinking, young marketers. The topic eventually turned to the effectiveness of email marketing for financial advisors. Although opinions differed greatly on the types of campaigns financial advisors should leverage, there was one thing we could all agree on:  Email marketing, when done correctly, is widely effective.

But what does that mean for financial advisor email marketing, now that we are in 2019?

Read more of this post

The Unexpected Costs of Chasing Your Dreams [Infographic]

Many hopeful freelancers start their business adventure so they can take control over their time and finances. As a self-employed freelancer, you get to set your own hours and decide how much you make based on how hard you work. You can decide to pursue projects that interest you the most, and ultimately do your best work. The appeal of starting off on your own is the reason why a third of Americans are currently freelance.

If you’ve ever considered quitting your day job in favor for self-employment, you’ve also probably had a few reservations as well. While the work is more flexible, so is the income. There’s less security when it comes to benefits and salary, which can land you in hot water if you don’t have a solid savings. In addition, finding and pitching your own clients can be incredibly intimidating. The fact of the matter is that starting your own venture, whether as a freelancer or entrepreneur can a difficult process.

However, that doesn’t mean that you can’t do it. With a solid plan for how you’ll make the transition financially, you can make the leap. To get you started on planning for unexpected self-employment expenses, Turbo created this helpful infographic. By making a few easy cuts, you can make your dream of quitting your day job a reality. Check it out below:

Via turbo.intuit.com: Read more of this post

How Companies Use Skills Assessments

The following content was submitted by Vervoe. The original article can be found here.

We analyzed how more than 4,000 companies use skills assessments on Vervoe, particularly employer and candidate preferences, and wanted to share the results with you.

Here are some of the most interesting things we learned:

COMPANIES

Hiring funnel

The first step companies tend to replace with skills assessments is phone screening. Intuitively this makes sense because it’s a manual process that is very time consuming. Instead, recruiters can avoid screening altogether and review candidates after they’ve completed a series of job-related tasks.

Many companies have been able to consolidate several steps into one and reduce the number of steps in their process. This reduces the burden for candidates. As a result, the average number of stages in a hiring funnel is between three and four.

Nearly 70% of companies are using a skills assessment at the top of the hiring funnel. This is consistent with the removal of phone screening, which is typically a top of funnel activity.

While corporates often use skills assessments at the top of the funnel, the companies most likely to use assessments at the bottom of the funnel are staffing firms. Read more of this post

How to Grow Your Business With Calculated Risk-Taking [Infographic]

The following content was submitted on behalf of Valpak.

Any major business move requires taking a risk. Whether you leave your corporate job to pursue a passion project, launch a new product, or partner with a new company, it can be daunting to make a drastic change. Thankfully, there’s a helpful strategy to weigh the potential outcome before taking the leap.

Calculated risk-taking involves carefully considering the pros and cons of a decision, with a thoughtful plan behind it. There are helpful steps, tools, and tactics you can use break down the outcome into smaller digestible steps. Make a list of everything that could go south if you move forward with the decision, whether it’s related to your business finances, relationships, self-care, or time. Schedule regular check-ins as you work towards a goal to see what kind of progress you’re making. The more you understand all potential costs to that risk, the better you can improve its outcome.

For a helpful breakdown on calculated risks, view the visual from Valpak below. It covers steps to follow so you can anticipate red flags and successful company who have used this method. Read more of this post

How to Price a Product or Service [Infographic]

The following content was submitted on behalf of Fundera.

In a dense market, it can be difficult for your business to acquire the capital it needs and stay afloat. Between branding, sales, and everyday operations, the cash that comes in can quickly flow out. That’s why it’s essential to select a pricing strategy that works for your business. The right strategy will not only help you stay afloat, but establish your branding within a market, and differentiate you from competition. To do this, you must conduct a thorough analysis of your company and the market.

First, if you’re not already aware of your costs, take time to account for these. Add up your expenses and overhead to get a finite number you’ll need to break even. Then set a ballpark number in profit that you’d like to achieve to determine a good price point for your product or service. This will give you a good idea about how much revenue you’ll need, as well as keeping you motivated to reach your goals.

Next, get to know your market. Take a look at the pricing strategies of your competitors, as well as how they’re marketing themselves to their audience. Look at the website, social media, and blogs to determine how they’re positioning themselves and what you can offer that they can’t. Knowing what your audience expects will go a long way towards help you compete.

With a thorough understanding of your market and profit goals, you will be better able to select  a pricing strategy that drives success for your business. For more on which pricing strategy is right for you, check out this infographic below by Fundera: Read more of this post

Stop Screening Candidates: What Recruiters Can Learn from Designers

The following content was submitted by Vervoe. The original article can be found here.

Screening candidates isn’t helping you.

In technology, user experience design is very close to our hearts. We are constantly trying to make it easier for our prospective customers to gain value from our products and services. We try to make the experience as welcoming as possible and take them on a journey.

When it comes to our prospective team members, perversely, we seem to take the opposite approach. When people express an interest in joining our teams, we seem to go to great lengths to push them away. We actively discourage them. We screen them.

To screen:

“To test or examine someone or something to discover if there is anything wrong with the person or thing.”

– Cambridge Dictionary

What? Really?  

That’s how traditional recruitment works. When people want to join our ranks, we try to find out what is wrong with them so we can rule them out. There is something inherently wrong with that approach.

What does that say about us? What message are we sending to people? When I try to put myself in the shoes of a candidate, this quote comes to mind:

“Sometimes it’s the journey that teaches you a lot about your destination.”

– Drake

If the journey is obstructionist and unpleasant, if I’m being screened as if there is something wrong with me, that must say something about the destination.

So let’s change that. Read more of this post

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