Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Why I’m Not a “Social Justice” Warrior: What About Non-Drinkers’ and Short Peoples’ Pay and Representation in the Workforce?

Previously, I mentioned declining to post certain third-party submitted content at this blog. I’m sure it raises eyebrows whenever I reject content promoting, say, women in the workplace. So I thought it best to explain why I’m not making noise about race and gender instead of leaving this open to speculation.

Instances of racism and sexism exist, however there are plenty of other biases and experiences of “oppression” that never seem to occur  to most people just because they’re riled up, fixated, and obsessed about two issues when it comes to the work realm (and it’s two because there isn’t much talk about LGBT pay and representation comparatively speaking). Did you know that differences in earnings, claims of bias and discrimination, and/or experiences of “oppression” exist when it comes to:

(1.) tall vs. short people, Read more of this post

How to Optimize Your Small Business Delivery Services

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Growing demand for delivery may have you thinking it’s time to outsource your last-mile delivery process. But what if your team could deliver faster and more efficiently and handle greater capacity without giving up control over your customers’ experience? A route-optimization software can help small businesses across the globe do all of these things and more.

 

The Delivery Challenges Small Businesses Face

When it comes to the local delivery challenges facing small businesses, we’ve learned a lot from working with more than 800 businesses all over the world. There is immense pressure on companies of all sizes to be able to compete with Amazon’s standard for two-day delivery and consumers’ rising expectations for convenience. 

 

Shoppers expect retailers to offer delivery, and if those customers aren’t able to get their orders fast enough (or at a price that they find reasonable), many customers will go somewhere else. 

 

According to a study conducted by the National Retail Foundation, 90% of consumers say convenience impacts their decision when selecting retailers, and 97% of consumers reported that they had abandoned a purchase because they felt it was inconvenient. Read more of this post

5 Tips for Building a Culture of Security Among Remote Employees

5 Tips for Building a Culture of Security Among Remote Employees

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In one of our previous posts, we highlighted the importance that making security a part of your organizational culture played in keeping your remote workforce secure during the COVID-19 pandemic. But what does that entail? In this post, we’re going to flesh out key steps that security teams and their leadership should take in order to make a strong culture of security a reality within their organizations.

 

1. Security culture is inseparable from the values of your organization’s leadership

Like any other organizational value, building a culture of security starts at the top. Invested stakeholders, usually starting with senior leadership, must cascade the types of cultural changes they wish to see by helping spearhead initiatives that will ultimately transform their organization. Although it is IT’s job to educate and engage with employees who break security policies and don’t follow security best practices, it would be very difficult for IT to function in an organization where leadership doesn’t embody the values needed to maintain a secure organization.  Read more of this post

What Is Reverse Logistics? The Delivery Process You’re Overlooking

What is Reverse Logistics?

Reverse logistics is any part of the logistics process where goods or services move from what is typically their final destination (the customer) back to their origin (or in some cases, to a third location). Reverse logistics encompasses work that happens after a product is delivered to a customer.

Let’s say you run a craft brewery. Delivering kegs to restaurants would be part of your forward logistics process. Picking up empty kegs from restaurants and bringing them back to your brewery would be reverse logistics.

Read more of this post

How Delivery Planning Can Grow Your Business in 2020

What Is Delivery Planning?

Delivery planning is the practice of planning out routes and logistics to deliver products. Companies that deliver products such as pizzas, flowers, and water all use delivery planning to get their products into the hands of customers.

 

The four factors of successful delivery planning

 

There are four factors you should consider when assessing your delivery operations. A well-executed delivery plan will excel in each of the following areas: Read more of this post

Can I Afford to Move Out? [Flowchart]

As you may be starting to grow up and toying with the idea of moving out on your own, there may be some things to consider. Especially if you’ve already started stockpiling your savings for future apartment investments, you may be already working towards these. For instance, creating and setting a budget can help you get in the flow of being held responsible for bills and practice accountability. 

Even though getting your first place can sound more than enticing, you may not be able to go back if things go sour. If you end up getting a lease outside of a month to month contract, you could be there anywhere from three months or longer. Needless to say, living on your own can sometimes feel overwhelming. You may be looking through Pinterest at all the beautiful apartment designs, yet if you don’t have the savings saved up, you may not be able to get exactly everything you want. 

If you’ve been wanting to move out for a while, you may have already accumulated a decent savings account. To get a better sense of where you’re at working up towards this next stage of your life, follow Mint’s flowchart

Now, if you passed the test and are ready to take things to the next level. Print out the moving checklist to ensure you and your budget are on the right track to success. 

Lastly, cheers to you, your new apartment, or your savings account that’s helping you work towards this big move!  Read more of this post

What Is Outbound Logistics and Why Is It So Important to Modern Business?

What is Outbound Logistics? 

Outbound logistics is a term for the processes of storing, moving and distributing goods. It includes all systems that help prepare an order and get it to the end customer. 

The different stages are warehousing and storage, distribution, transportation, and last-mile delivery.

Let’s take a more in-depth look at the individual areas of outbound logistics:

 

1. Warehousing and storage

To meet demand as you make continued sales, you need to keep a surplus of products in storage. In January 2020, US companies had, on average, a ratio of 1.39 inventory to monthly sales.

The goal of warehousing is to keep products safe and readily available while awaiting purchase. You can store products in your own warehouse or one that is owned by a third-party logistics provider. 

2. Inventory management 

Inventory management involves picking, packing, and storing your goods in the right place. Many warehouses have inventory management systems to help with this. Read more of this post

On the Clock: A Pocket Guide to Time Clock Rounding

 

On the Clock: A Pocket Guide to Time Clock Rounding
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Back in the day when handling payroll was pretty much a pen-and-paper process, employers would use rounding to account for odd minutes and seconds outside the regular work schedule. Time clock rounding helped streamline calculating wages and save chunks of time in the process. 

 

But does it still make sense today?

What Is Time Clock Rounding?

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), all employers are required to track and store employee time records completely and accurately. This can be done either by asking employees to write their hours down, using regular time clocks or through time-tracking software.

 

“So, what does time clock rounding mean?”

Read more of this post

Forward and Backward Scheduling: Definitions, and How You Can Use Them to Compete

Missed deadlines mean lost customers.

This is true whether you’re shipping products, performing installations, or delivering food. Imagine you run a cable company. You have a customer that rearranged their day and stayed home from work to let your installation specialist in during a 4 hour service window. If your worker shows up late, you’re probably going to lose that customer (and likely get a bad review). Fortunately, there are two proven strategies that can help you stay on top of deadlines, increase customer satisfaction, and earn repeat sales: backward scheduling and forward scheduling.

 

What Is Forward and Backward Scheduling?

Forward scheduling and backward scheduling are planning strategies. Both methods are useful for strategic planning at all levels of complexity. Whether you’re mapping delivery routes for multiple drivers or scheduling maintenance appointments for service teams, you can benefit from using one or both of these strategies. Read more of this post

5 Types of Corporate Culture: Which One Is Your Company?

This article was originally published at Enplug.com

Culture affects every aspect of your company, from the public’s perception of your brand to your employees’ job satisfaction to your bottom line. Because there’s so much at stake, it’s important that your corporate culture is adaptable and open to improvement – which starts with being able to articulate just what kind of culture your company has.

While no two cultures are exactly alike (the nuances are too great!), there are defining characteristics that tend to place organizational cultures into one of five categories, or types, which we’ve outlined below. Often, the industry of a company will dictate its culture to some degree, but that doesn’t mean your culture can’t be changed. Thankfully, culture is not static, but rather evolving.

So which of these five corporate culture types sums up your company best? Or do you have some elements of each? While no one culture is the best or worst of the bunch – each has its pros and cons – there’s something to learn from companies that fall under any of these categories. Read more of this post

Online Food Delivery on the Rise

Currently the traditional model of delivery, where a customer contacts a local restaurant directly, still accounts for nearly 90% of all delivery orders, with ⅔ of those being ordered by phone. However as technology has shown in many other commercial markets, the ability and desire to purchase or order anything online is growing quickly.

Recently the worldwide market for food delivery has been estimated to be worth over $87 billion, which is around only 1% of the total food market, and 4% of food sales by restaurants or fast-food chains. Americans themselves are expected to spend over $12.5 billion a year by 2019 on delivery food. With the estimated growth the by around 3.5% per year for the next 5 years, many companies and startups are trying to get their piece of the pie.

Companies like Deliveroo, UberEats, and Eat24 have slowly grown to become the middle-man between the customer and restaurants throughout many cities in North America and the UK. The concept is to basically offer as large a choice of restaurants as possible based on your address. Two models of this concept have been developed that both involve dealing with numerous restaurants but handle the delivery of food completely different. One model is operated by aggregators. These aggregators take orders online or via app, and pass the order along to each individual restaurant who then handles delivery themselves. The other model can be defined as “new delivery,” which is a concept that requires the company taking the orders to also control the logistics and delivery. Read more of this post

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