ADHD in the Workplace Research

Lynn Patra:

Do you or someone you know have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)? If so, consider taking the survey introduced in this blog post. This survey is being administered by the Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA), and results will be used to benefit those who have ADHD and experience workplace issues. Also check out “Truths That Will Change the Way You View ADHD.”

Originally posted on Get NutMegged ADHD:

The Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA) is conducting an online (short) survey about ADHD issues in the workplace, so I thought I’d share.  They’re hoping to get 1,000 completed surveys by June, but the more we can submit, the better.  The ADDA will use the results to create an ADHD awareness publicity campaign to help educate the general public and employers about potential ADHD workplace issues and hopefully, potential solutions.  

The survey is geared toward adults with ADHD that are (or have been) employed.  I urge you guys to take a few minutes to complete it.  I promise it won’t take long.  This is important stuff.  The more completed surveys, the better the data.  You can read a little more about the survey in this ADHD Coaches Organization Circle or jump right to the survey here.

While accommodations for those with ADD / ADHD do exist, those waters are…

View original 224 more words

What a Recent Misadventure Taught Me About the Need for Adventure and Excitement in Life

English: Disneyland Adventureland.

English: Disneyland Adventureland. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“There’s virtually no way to get excitement and adventure through a job,” people would tell me, “If you want those things, you’re better off trying to get them through non-work activities.” I would begrudgingly nod in agreement as relatively safe and predictable jobs seemed more salient in my mind. Until this day, I never thought I would experience the type of exhilaration that comes along with some of life’s challenges so I never knew, before, what I had been missing out on. Continue reading

Being bored (and zoning out) at work can make us more creative?

English: A bored person

English: A bored person (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Having written about the problem of boredom at work (where an individual’s skill level surpasses the challenge of the tasks), lets turn now to one of the possible benefits of boredom… creativity! The following article was very interesting indeed: Being bored at work can make us more creative. Some excerpts follow:

Most of us think of being bored at work as a negative experience, but a new study suggests it can have positive results including an increase in creativity because it gives us time to daydream.

I do find that daydreaming fuels my creativity, although I can imagine this generally being a tough sell to employers. Also, it turns out that zoning out can also help boost creative problem-solving (see More Than Just ‘Zoning Out': Exploring the Cognitive Processes Behind Mind Wandering). Even better huh? Continuing on with the article: Continue reading

Lynn Patra:

Boredom at work is one issue that many people I’ve encountered don’t take seriously. Some have even asked me, “How can you be bored when you have so many repetitive tasks to do all day?” The answer is explained very well in a post by Alex Hagan. This post contrasts the roots of boredom with the roots of anxiety at work. The issue of establishing a work environment that would facilitate engagement and the experience of “flow” is also discussed alongside an interesting look at how the typical environment at Las Vegas casinos is designed to keep people immersed in activity there.

Originally posted on Strategic Workforce Planning:

Bellagio Carpet

Bellagio Carpet – thomaslockehobbs.com

Does Las Vegas have anything to teach Employers about employee engagement?

I’ve recently been reading about “flow”, a state of extreme focus and productivity – and the lengths that Las Vegas casinos will go to in encouraging it.  This got me thinking about how Flow could be applied to the workplace, and whether Las Vegas has anything to teach employers about it.

View original 664 more words

When Email is Better than Skype and Face-to-Face Communication

As mentioned in a previous post, I’m going to share my own personal experience with a cross-cultural communication problem that only reared its ugly head when visual cues were available. Thus, this post may substantially depart from my usual writing style. Continue reading