Social Media Burnout and the Value of Time Spent Unplugged

Looking back on over a year’s worth of blogging and social media networking, I’m grateful for all the opportunities that have opened up to me through actively engaging in these activities. I’ve met interesting people and made some valuable connections, and I continue to look forward to more of this! Blogging has also been a fun way to develop my thinking and writing skills. However, I’ve also learned how challenging it is to frequently and consistently develop original content. I’ve followed a number of bloggers who have done so and applaud them all! Continue reading

The brain science of sleep (or the trouble with the snooze button)

Lynn Patra:

Not feeling “on the ball” on workday mornings? There’s a reason for this. According to the brain science of sleep, it takes more hours to become alert and ready to work than generally believed. Despite appearances, we really aren’t all that productive during our first hours awake as Maria Konnikova explains in this post.

Originally posted on Brainwaves For Leaders:

Since this is the last post before the neuresourcegroup offices close for the holidays—and especially because we all plan to catch up on lost sleep—we thought we’d reprint this intriguing article by Maria Konnikova on the importance of maintaining a natural sleep cycle and the high cost of ignoring it.

Also, since we’ve just announced that our next working breakfast will feature Australian nap advocate Thea O’Connor on ways to manage fatigue (28 March 2014 in Brisbane), it’s not only an appropriate way to end a great year but a perfect way to set the scene for the next.  Happy, restful holidays to all!

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On a typical workday morning, if you’re like most people, you don’t wake up naturally. Instead, the ring of an alarm clock probably jerks you out of sleep. Depending on when you went to bed, what day of the week it is, and…

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Making Virtual Work a Success for Employer and Employee

Better CollaborationThe next Better Collaboration video conferencing event on strategies for driving virtual workers’ productivity is coming up! The information that will be presented is geared towards organization leaders who’re interested in learning about the best tools and practices for virtual work arrangements. This event will take place on Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 2:00pm-3:00pm Eastern Standard Time/11:00am-12:00pm Pacific Standard Time. To register, please visit the Better Collaboration Meetup site. Details regarding this event follow: Continue reading

Is our native intelligence being burdened by increasing complexity?

Are People Getting Dumber?: The World Grows More Complex” presents one of the funniest social commentaries I’ve ever read. At another level, I know it’s not a funny issue of course. Rather, this turns out to be an interesting one to think about. Here is an excerpt as written by Linda S. Gottfredson, a professor in the School of Education who studies the sociology of intelligence at the University of Delaware:

Many of us feel stupider by the year, if not the week. Age and ill health take their toll, but Mother Nature isn’t the culprit. It’s those clever people busily complicating our lives, innovation by innovation, upgrade upon upgrade. They don’t lower our native intelligence, but relentlessly burden it… Just ask a humorist. One “Frank and Ernest” comic strip shows a caveman pointing to an engraved stone tablet and saying: “Look! I just invented writing!” His companion says: “Thanks a lot! You just made everybody else in the world illiterate!” Continue reading

Lessons from Gaming: Leading with Your Natural Strengths

In this post, I’ll discuss the reason for these resultant correlations between wealth and range of skills invested in (from What the Most Successful People Have in Common by Nicole Carter):

…middle class survey respondents reported having six skills. The high-net-worth group, on the other hand, reported having only two skills. That’s because the most successful people are aware of their limitations and strengths, and focus on what they’re best at, Schiff said. In fact, 58 percent of middle class millionaires said they work to improve on skills they lack, but only 7 percent of high-net -worth individuals do the same. The wealthiest respondents? Not one of them said they worked on improving areas of weakness. Continue reading

Portraying Yourself Professionally Through Social Media [Infographic]

For those who’re purposefully looking to maintain a professional image via social media, here’s an infographic that has been going around. Much of this information is based on common sense. However, the percentages reflecting employers’ or recruiter’s emphasis on some social media sites more than others for information about you may be particularly helpful to keep in mind. Hence, you can make an informed decision about where to expend your efforts. Alternatively, for those of you interested in protecting your privacy, some general but important tips appear towards the bottom of this graphic.

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Gender Representation Disparities in Various Career Fields

Why is Human Resources (HR) dominated by women? It’s been difficult to ignore how frequently this topic has been tackled in the past few years. After considering a number of articles (listed below), I’ve decided to add my voice to the discussion on internal drivers behind career decisions while considering the role of brain development. Indeed, when considering why there are vastly different proportions of men and women in various fields, more insight can be gained by looking beyond physical differences and paying attention to internal predispositions instead.