Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

Social Media Platforms That Consolidate Your Other Social Media Activities

Over the past few months I’ve learned more about various social media tools by sitting in on classes offered in my region through 530 Media Project. Michelle Rogers, content editor at The Record Searchlight/, facilitated these classes. By participating, I learned about some platforms that consolidate your activities on other social media sites to give you an overall view (including statistical analysis) of your activities. In this post, I’ll introduce a couple of them: RebelMouse and Klout.


RebelMouse merges the content you share or like on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, RSS feeds, Pinterest, Flickr, Google+, and LinkedIn. What you receive is an attractive magazine-like, social front page display of your online presence. See what mine looks like below (click to enlarge). Read more of this post

A Day at Work with My Feathered Colleague

The idea for this special post came from a friend whose blog showcases spectacular photography work, featuring wildlife, art, and culture, from exotic locales around the world. Check out her work at


People have been shocked by my ability to perform solitary work (e.g., reading, writing, and research) for several hours a day, several days a week without feeling lonely. The reason why I can pull this off is because my introverted temperament makes me well-suited for this kind of work. Being devoid of human companionship doesn’t mean I’m completely alone however. Meet my feathered colleague, Nikita, a Pacific Parrotlet whose antics keep me in good spirits. Read more of this post

Ways to provide interesting, engaging content if you’re too busy to blog

Those of you who blog may identify with the struggle to post consistently. If you blog to promote yourself as a professional as I do however, posting inconsistently and taking a bunch of blogging hiatuses gives the impression that you’re flaky and unreliable. Not maintaining a consistent online presence also means that you may fall off of people’s radar. If you’ve been following this blog since its inception, you know I’m guilty of the above. We bloggers may understand each other’s struggles with consistency. Life happens, which means being super busy sometimes or needing a break to enjoy life without being tethered to technology at other times.

Over the course of my journey as a blogger however, I’ve picked up a few methods for providing content that are less labor intensive. Yes, I’m talking about curating content. By taking this route, you can get away with writing a brief but meaningful introduction or comment about the content you’re featuring and then letting the content do the rest of the talking. In this post, I’ll share a list of methods that go beyond well-known tactics such as reblogging someone else’s post or introducing infographics.  Read more of this post

Psychology of the Office Space [Infographic]

A look at the history of the office reveals that office space configurations have changed considerably over time. Naturally, different space configurations impact workers differently (and of course, at the individual level, the manner in which physical space impacts people depends on the individual’s personality, job, and tasks the individual performs). More specifically, environmental space can positively or negatively impact attention spans, productivity, creativity, job satisfaction, and stress level.

University of Southern California, Dornsife, designed an infographic that expands upon this subject. Personally, I find myself agreeing with this assessment of the complete open office plan. However, I doubt that this phenomena, along with cubicles and private offices, will become extinct. A reduction? Yes. However, the complete absence of such configurations? No.

Not only do companies and work cultures vary, but there’s also great heterogeneity when it comes to people, the roles they play at work, and the types of tasks they perform. So, I think that there will always be a need for a variety of office configurations even if some configurations are more prevalent than others. For example, those who deal with sensitive information and interactions (like lawyers, doctors, and therapists) will continue to need a private office. This infographic is surely thought-provoking. Check it out and let me know what you think!

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Why some employers are ditching the office — literally

L. P.:

Here are some recent facts and figures summarizing the prevalence of telecommuting as well as existence of virtual companies and distributed teams. As these percentages depict, regular telecommuting along with employers who operate mostly or completely virtually remain uncommon. However, these phenomena have enjoyed some growth. Read on to find out which companies have completely dispensed with the need for a physical office.

Originally posted on Fortune:

The workplace has reconfigured over past decades from private offices to cubicles, and now the de rigeuropen plan schemes are seeing a backlash. It may well be that some people just have a problem with working out of an office — rather than their homes.

Nearly two out of three large companies in the U.S. permit occasional telecommuting, about double the number from 2005, a 2013 study found. But just 33% of major employers allow “regular” telecommuting–just 2% more than what it was in 2005. And the Telework research network found in 2013 that only 2.5% of Americans consider home their primary workplace.

Still, a small but growing number of companies are taking a more radical stance and doing away with offices altogether, relying on collaborative tools like Slack and Dropbox. There are 76 companies on the most recent list from FlexJobs of virtual companies and distributed teams…

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How Technology Has Changed the Meeting [Infographic]

It is a rare occasion that I broadcast back-to-back infographic-centered posts however, upon encountering this infographic, I knew this must be shared. If you’re like me, an image-based timeline makes historical information easier to digest and retain. Behold the technological evolution from 1958 to the present and, from here, to what’s on the horizon.

Advancements in technology have changed the world of business in terms of communication, presentation, and project management. With these technological developments came a great change in the dynamics of the meeting room. Cloud based presentations and video conferencing have blurred the lines between the office space, the home office, and the meeting room. Brandeis University concludes that ultimately, the meeting room, as we know it, may disappear completely.

Brandeis University designed a compelling infographic that looks into the past and future of the meeting room to see how technology changes the way we do business. Read more of this post

What You Need to Know About Psychological Manipulation [Infographic]

This post accompanies my previous post on manipulators. One particular piece of information that I find valuable here is a guideline for distinguishing social influence from manipulation. In my view, what qualifies as manipulation is an attempt to restrict another’s sense of free will. Furthermore, as I am a “no means no” kind of person, my interpretation of “[social influence] does not threaten anyone’s health or well-being” extends to influencers’ being able to accept “no” for an answer. Continuing to persist violates the time and psychological space of the one who refused. Finally, to clarify, the “emotional hot buttons” section lists characteristics of individuals who are easier targets for manipulators. I welcome your thoughts on the information presented here. Read more of this post

Dissecting the Manipulative Helper

As a break from the topic of technology-driven changes in work-life, let’s turn to a work-related subject that will likely remain intact: difficult people and, specifically, a type of difficult person who generally goes unnoticed and unchallenged – the manipulative helper.

Overtly difficult people are a pain but are easier to spot, evade, and take action against compared to ones wearing the mask of a benevolent helper. Essentially, manipulative “helpers” inflict damage and get away with it because they’re presumed to have good intentions. Recognizing such individuals will help you make informed decisions about who to spend time and energy cultivating professional relationships with and, hopefully, facilitate success in building a quality network.

Mean people


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Hunting for Remote Working Jobs

L. P.:

Remote work opportunities are difficult to come by and work-from-home scams abound. Hence, information from those who’re in-the-know regarding where to find genuine remote work opportunities is so invaluable and appreciated. If you’re searching for such an opportunity, check out the list in this post by Marieke Guy.

Originally posted on Ramblings of a Remote Worker:

When I was made redundant from my previous job I discovered that finding a new remote working job wasn’t going to be an easy task. Back in 2012 I did a scout of remote Working policies at universities – most had little to offer. The future looked bleak! Luckily I started work for Open Knowledge!

Since then finding a remote working job has become a little easier. There is now quite a few websites dedicated to employing people


  • Remotive – apparently “remote + productive = remotive”. This search site contains mainly developer type stuff (with partners from InVision, Zapier, iDoneThis, Sqwiggle, HelpScout, Ghost, Formstack, Blossom, & CloudPeeps) but there are some other jobs on there.
  • We Work Remotely is a site 37Signals on the back of their excellent ‘Remote’ book. You can also follow them on Twitter.
  • Working Nomads – “A curated list of remote jobs, for…

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The Challenge of Telework Consulting and a New Direction for Me

During the course of blogging about telework and topics related to modern work-life issues, people who’ve recently connected with me have received the impression that I “have it made,” making a living doing what I love. This isn’t the truth, so I’m setting the record straight about my experience with, and understanding of, consulting in the area of facilitating remote work arrangements at organizations. Additionally, as I hinted about undertaking a personal YouTube content creation project in an earlier post, I’ll hereby provide readers with more information about this as I’ll be integrating it as new subject matter in this blog. Read more of this post


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