Why I’m Not on Facebook and Other Musings by a “Non-Joiner”

Young people without Facebook accounts are regarded as suspicious by a number of employers, their human resources departments, and some psychologists. Might this group of resisters have something sinister to hide, and even be psychopathic? This issue has been reported on herehere, and here (from 2012). The fact that it’s taken me so long to notice that non-joiners are regarded as strange in a negative way shows my limited interest in Facebook. Now that I’ve received the memo though, I’ll say I’m not surprised that people are wondering, “What’s different about the non-joiners?” and then coming up with hunches that have a negative spin.

Life has dealt me a strange hand such that I find myself (1) a non-participant when it comes to a number of activities that most enjoy and (2) having to vociferously defend my preferences. As a result, I’ve come to notice how consistently people assume non-joiners to have character flaws. Observe: Continue reading

Team Nature or Team Nurture? Disillusionment with the Great Debate

Many of you have no doubt experienced times where you’ve reevaluated educational or career decisions and reconsidered what you hoped to have gained through your devotion to a particular field in hindsight. For me, this time came – a principle reason why I’ve slowed down on the blogging and why this post will be a bit different. Having spent time thinking about my own decisions and what I’d hoped to gain by acquiring a professional degree and training in psychology, I’ll address the problems with the “specialist” model of work, team vs. team mentality, and professional culture-fit in this field. Hence, what I have to share may especially be of value to those who’re considering the field of psychology. I hope that aspiring professionals can help change the troubling trends I’ll describe. Continue reading

10 Shocking Stats About Employee Engagement [Infographic]

Are these percentages shocking? Perhaps not to those of us who’re very intimately acquainted with the typical work scene. Likewise, perhaps not to those of us who’ve been following the issue of work engagement for a long while and are familiar with what studies have been saying. However, it’s important for leaders and managers to familiarize themselves with the concept of engagement, its implications, and what may be the reality at their organization. Take a look at this infographic, see if this describes the scenario at your organization, and share! Continue reading

Finding the right coach or mentor

Lynn Patra:

As we seek out ways to gain advantages in today’s world of work, enlisting the guidance of a coach or mentor has been one that has been important to many professionals. It’s critical, however, to know how to evaluate potential coaches and mentors. Check out the following invaluable tips and insights with regard to selecting an appropriate coach or mentor.

Originally posted on CATS 3000:

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In recent years, a vast number of people have become coaches, mentors, therapists. personal trainers – you name it, there’s now a helper for it.

Some of these people are highly “qualified” and have taken formal routes through universities and colleges to get qualifications that are recognised by professional bodies. Others have gained various kinds of certificates from more commercially focused training providers. Some of these are bogus, some are affiliated to “proper” institutions. Some simply require you to attend a weekend course, while others demand a certain number of “completed hours”.

Getting a university degree or professional certificate does not necessarily make someone a good therapist. Equally, someone who has completed a weekend course in Life Coaching and then printed some business cards, might just a danger to themself and to you.

Finding the right coach or mentor requires a bit of research – checking that credentials are authentic…

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Social Media Burnout and the Value of Time Spent Unplugged

Looking back on over a year’s worth of blogging and social media networking, I’m grateful for all the opportunities that have opened up to me through actively engaging in these activities. I’ve met interesting people and made some valuable connections, and I continue to look forward to more of this! Blogging has also been a fun way to develop my thinking and writing skills. However, I’ve also learned how challenging it is to frequently and consistently develop original content. I’ve followed a number of bloggers who have done so and applaud them all! Continue reading

The brain science of sleep (or the trouble with the snooze button)

Lynn Patra:

Not feeling “on the ball” on workday mornings? There’s a reason for this. According to the brain science of sleep, it takes more hours to become alert and ready to work than generally believed. Despite appearances, we really aren’t all that productive during our first hours awake as Maria Konnikova explains in this post.

Originally posted on Brainwaves For Leaders:

Since this is the last post before the neuresourcegroup offices close for the holidays—and especially because we all plan to catch up on lost sleep—we thought we’d reprint this intriguing article by Maria Konnikova on the importance of maintaining a natural sleep cycle and the high cost of ignoring it.

Also, since we’ve just announced that our next working breakfast will feature Australian nap advocate Thea O’Connor on ways to manage fatigue (28 March 2014 in Brisbane), it’s not only an appropriate way to end a great year but a perfect way to set the scene for the next.  Happy, restful holidays to all!

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On a typical workday morning, if you’re like most people, you don’t wake up naturally. Instead, the ring of an alarm clock probably jerks you out of sleep. Depending on when you went to bed, what day of the week it is, and…

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Is our native intelligence being burdened by increasing complexity?

Are People Getting Dumber?: The World Grows More Complex” presents one of the funniest social commentaries I’ve ever read. At another level, I know it’s not a funny issue of course. Rather, this turns out to be an interesting one to think about. Here is an excerpt as written by Linda S. Gottfredson, a professor in the School of Education who studies the sociology of intelligence at the University of Delaware:

Many of us feel stupider by the year, if not the week. Age and ill health take their toll, but Mother Nature isn’t the culprit. It’s those clever people busily complicating our lives, innovation by innovation, upgrade upon upgrade. They don’t lower our native intelligence, but relentlessly burden it… Just ask a humorist. One “Frank and Ernest” comic strip shows a caveman pointing to an engraved stone tablet and saying: “Look! I just invented writing!” His companion says: “Thanks a lot! You just made everybody else in the world illiterate!” Continue reading

Lessons from Gaming: Leading with Your Natural Strengths

In this post, I’ll discuss the reason for these resultant correlations between wealth and range of skills invested in (from What the Most Successful People Have in Common by Nicole Carter):

…middle class survey respondents reported having six skills. The high-net-worth group, on the other hand, reported having only two skills. That’s because the most successful people are aware of their limitations and strengths, and focus on what they’re best at, Schiff said. In fact, 58 percent of middle class millionaires said they work to improve on skills they lack, but only 7 percent of high-net -worth individuals do the same. The wealthiest respondents? Not one of them said they worked on improving areas of weakness. Continue reading

Gender Representation Disparities in Various Career Fields

Why is Human Resources (HR) dominated by women? It’s been difficult to ignore how frequently this topic has been tackled in the past few years. After considering a number of articles (listed below), I’ve decided to add my voice to the discussion on internal drivers behind career decisions while considering the role of brain development. Indeed, when considering why there are vastly different proportions of men and women in various fields, more insight can be gained by looking beyond physical differences and paying attention to internal predispositions instead.

The Underbelly of Online Social Networking: Stalking & Other Obsessive Behavior

For many professionals, the Internet is a valuable supplemental tool for promoting themselves as well as for meeting new and valuable contacts. Like other life phenomena however, building social connections over the Internet is not without risks, and this becomes very apparent when one experiences a rare encounter with a very attached individual. Continue reading