Work-Life Strategies & Solutions

On the Evolution of Work Systems in the Digital Economy

You Are Here: Thoughts on Working Remotely

ArtLogic

Brett G. Porter is Chief Engineer in Development Practices at Art & Logic, a 100% virtual company. With almost two decades’ worth of experience working remotely, Brett has substantial wisdom to share regarding virtual work arrangements that succeed. In “You Are Here: Thoughts on Working Remotely,” Brett’s article covers issues such as infrastructure requirements, keeping people connected, maintaining boundaries, structuring projects, as well as characteristics and circumstances that enable people to succeed at working remotely. Also, please visit “Office Free: Building the 21st Century Company” to vote for Art & Logic in SXSW Panelpicker Interactive 2016 and watch remote workers describe their experiences in a highly engaging video! (Successful introverted remote workers are represented by the way.)

Originally posted on Art & Logic:

I’ve been seeing a lot of articles and discussion lately on the pros and cons of using distributed teams. It’s a topic I’ve given a lot of thought to — I just had my 17 year anniversary working for Art & Logic in a completely distributed environment, and over the years there have been many words written both in favor of it (see Scott Berkun’s recent book The Year Without Pants) and against (maybe most emphatically by Alistair Cockburn, who in his book Agile Software Development (2002) who says that ‘distributed development is becoming more commonplace, but it is not becoming more effective’). I’d certainly take exception to the assertion that it’s not possible to be successful and effective developing software in distributed teams, but that doing so requires that you adopt or reject certain situations, practices, and scenarios:

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PeopleG2: A virtually-based, leading human capital due diligence service provider

peopleg2logoAt its inception in 2001, PeopleG2 started out as an office-based company.  However, in 2008, founder and chief executive Chris Dyer, decided to transition into a virtual company to accommodate a growing workforce and surmount challenging financial pressures introduced by the recession. According to Michelle Rafter, in “Employees told to go home – and work,” a small office in Brea, California remains for a handful of staff who value having a physical office. However, the rest of the staff, comprised of researchers, sales and customer service representatives, and administrative personnel, work as a virtual team.

This arrangement has worked out so well that Chris Dyer never looked back and, today, PeopleG2 serves as a testament to how companies can successfully switch from brick and mortar to virtual. Just recently, Flexjobs featured them in “26 Virtual Companies That Thrive on Remote Work.” How did Dyer and his team make such a successful transition?

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The Future of Money [Infographic]

This gorgeous infographic, which was created by Envisioning Technological Research Foundation, traces the history of money (and other previous methods of exchange) and provides speculation on the future evolution of money. Realization of this potential for a more decentralized, distributed system would significantly impact our lives. As explained in the infographic, “People are coalescing and demanding free, real-time access to their transaction information in order to reclaim financial decisions from institutions.”

Envisioning is an independent, virtual research institute based in Brazil. The global team is comprised of academics, designers, and hackers. Their mission is to study technology in order to understand accelerating change and provide technological foresight to policy and decision-makers worldwide.

To see an enlarged image of this infographic or download a PDF copy, click here.

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A Practical Reminder From My Peer Mentor: Don’t Argue With Idiots

Never argue with a fool; onlookers may not be able to tell the difference. ~Mark Twain

Even while intending to enjoy a quiet evening surfing the Internet, today’s increased interconnectivity means higher chances of interacting with people who’re very different from you (e.g. at different developmental stages with different capacities to understand various subjects). Unexpectedly, you may find yourself slipping into a debate and committed to seeing it through to the end.

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Social Media Platforms That Consolidate Your Other Social Media Activities

Over the past few months I’ve learned more about various social media tools by sitting in on classes offered in my region through 530 Media Project. Michelle Rogers, content editor at The Record Searchlight/Redding.com, facilitated these classes. By participating, I learned about some platforms that consolidate your activities on other social media sites to give you an overall view (including statistical analysis) of your activities. In this post, I’ll introduce a couple of them: RebelMouse and Klout.

RebelMouse

RebelMouse merges the content you share or like on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, RSS feeds, Pinterest, Flickr, Google+, and LinkedIn. What you receive is an attractive magazine-like, social front page display of your online presence. See what mine looks like below (click to enlarge). Read more of this post

A Day at Work with My Feathered Colleague

The idea for this special post came from a friend whose blog showcases spectacular photography work, featuring wildlife, art, and culture, from exotic locales around the world. Check out her work at http://cindyknoke.com.

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People have been shocked by my ability to perform solitary work (e.g., reading, writing, and research) for several hours a day, several days a week without feeling lonely. The reason why I can pull this off is because my introverted temperament makes me well-suited for this kind of work. Being devoid of human companionship doesn’t mean I’m completely alone however. Meet my feathered colleague, Nikita, a Pacific Parrotlet whose antics keep me in good spirits. Read more of this post

Ways to provide interesting, engaging content if you’re too busy to blog

Those of you who blog may identify with the struggle to post consistently. If you blog to promote yourself as a professional as I do however, posting inconsistently and taking a bunch of blogging hiatuses gives the impression that you’re flaky and unreliable. Not maintaining a consistent online presence also means that you may fall off of people’s radar. If you’ve been following this blog since its inception, you know I’m guilty of the above. We bloggers may understand each other’s struggles with consistency. Life happens, which means being super busy sometimes or needing a break to enjoy life without being tethered to technology at other times.

Over the course of my journey as a blogger however, I’ve picked up a few methods for providing content that are less labor intensive. Yes, I’m talking about curating content. By taking this route, you can get away with writing a brief but meaningful introduction or comment about the content you’re featuring and then letting the content do the rest of the talking. In this post, I’ll share a list of methods that go beyond well-known tactics such as reblogging someone else’s post or introducing infographics.  Read more of this post

Psychology of the Office Space [Infographic]

A look at the history of the office reveals that office space configurations have changed considerably over time. Naturally, different space configurations impact workers differently (and of course, at the individual level, the manner in which physical space impacts people depends on the individual’s personality, job, and tasks the individual performs). More specifically, environmental space can positively or negatively impact attention spans, productivity, creativity, job satisfaction, and stress level.

University of Southern California, Dornsife, designed an infographic that expands upon this subject. Personally, I find myself agreeing with this assessment of the complete open office plan. However, I doubt that this phenomena, along with cubicles and private offices, will become extinct. A reduction? Yes. However, the complete absence of such configurations? No.

Not only do companies and work cultures vary, but there’s also great heterogeneity when it comes to people, the roles they play at work, and the types of tasks they perform. So, I think that there will always be a need for a variety of office configurations even if some configurations are more prevalent than others. For example, those who deal with sensitive information and interactions (like lawyers, doctors, and therapists) will continue to need a private office. This infographic is surely thought-provoking. Check it out and let me know what you think!

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Why some employers are ditching the office — literally

L. P.:

Here are some recent facts and figures summarizing the prevalence of telecommuting as well as existence of virtual companies and distributed teams. As these percentages depict, regular telecommuting along with employers who operate mostly or completely virtually remain uncommon. However, these phenomena have enjoyed some growth. Read on to find out which companies have completely dispensed with the need for a physical office.

Originally posted on Fortune:

The workplace has reconfigured over past decades from private offices to cubicles, and now the de rigeuropen plan schemes are seeing a backlash. It may well be that some people just have a problem with working out of an office — rather than their homes.

Nearly two out of three large companies in the U.S. permit occasional telecommuting, about double the number from 2005, a 2013 study found. But just 33% of major employers allow “regular” telecommuting–just 2% more than what it was in 2005. And the Telework research network found in 2013 that only 2.5% of Americans consider home their primary workplace.

Still, a small but growing number of companies are taking a more radical stance and doing away with offices altogether, relying on collaborative tools like Slack and Dropbox. There are 76 companies on the most recent list from FlexJobs of virtual companies and distributed teams…

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How Technology Has Changed the Meeting [Infographic]

It is a rare occasion that I broadcast back-to-back infographic-centered posts however, upon encountering this infographic, I knew this must be shared. If you’re like me, an image-based timeline makes historical information easier to digest and retain. Behold the technological evolution from 1958 to the present and, from here, to what’s on the horizon.

Advancements in technology have changed the world of business in terms of communication, presentation, and project management. With these technological developments came a great change in the dynamics of the meeting room. Cloud based presentations and video conferencing have blurred the lines between the office space, the home office, and the meeting room. Brandeis University concludes that ultimately, the meeting room, as we know it, may disappear completely.

Brandeis University designed a compelling infographic that looks into the past and future of the meeting room to see how technology changes the way we do business. Read more of this post

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